Teen Alcahol Abuse

Topics: Drinking culture, Alcoholic beverage, Alcoholism Pages: 5 (1632 words) Published: October 8, 2013
Underage Alcohol Abuse
COM/172
August 14, 2013

Abstract
Alcohol is the easiest substance for teens to gain access to and leads to dangerous and risky behavior. Directly and indirectly, alcohol contributes to 75% of deaths amongst teens. Binge drinking amongst teens 16-18 years old is very dangerous and exceedingly prevalent. Research shows, teens primarily gain access to alcohol from their homes or the homes of their friends. In addition, studies have un-covered parents admitted to allowing their teen to drink alcohol while under their supervision. There are many myths about how serious the substance is and how parents need to react to consumption but overall alcohol is very serious and needs to be closely monitored.

Underage Alcohol Abuse
Alcohol is the easiest substance for teens to gain access to and leads to dangerous and risky behavior. There are many myths about underage drinking and the seriousness about the subject. Point blank, drinking is the number one killer of teens in America. Directly and indirectly, “alcohol contributes to 75% of deaths among teens” (2005, Aug 09). Binge drinking amongst teens 16 to 18 years old is very dangerous and exceedingly prevalent. Research shows, teens primarily gain access to alcohol from their own homes or the homes of their friends. Parents of teens 16 to 18 years old need to take precaution when bringing in alcoholic beverages into their homes and not advocate underage drinking. One myth about alcohol is parents believe it to be acceptable as long as the parents supervise the underage drinking. “One out of four teens has admitted to drinking alcohol in front of their parents. In addition, parents have admitted to allowing their teen to drink alcohol while under their supervision” (2005, Aug 09). I can also validate this because I was offered alcohol during family functions when I was 16 to 18 years old. My parents and aunts/uncles thought I was mature enough and encouraged drinking but only when I was around our family. Parents believe they are more experienced with alcohol and mostly can drink responsibly in the comfort of their own homes. However, while under the influence of alcohol, parents make impaired judgment decisions such as, allowing their teenage children to join in the alcohol consumption. Regarding my experience, I received the most encouragement mid-through the family parties as the adults grew more and more incoherent. My family is Mexican and in their country the legal drinking age is 18 years old. Nonetheless, I can remember being as young as 15 when I was first introduced to alcohol so the drinking age did not have the utmost importance either. My tolerance to drinking alcohol grew greater through the years, thus increasing my alcohol ingestion. Though nothing too drastic happened to me, I can disapprove by saying I grew up way before my time. “One third of the teens 16-18 that admitted to drinking stated they obtained the substance from their own parent’s liquor cabinet. This escalates to 40 percent when the parents of friends are included” (2005, Aug 09). My friends and I were fully aware of whose parents had alcohol in the house, and we conveniently would set up sleepovers or gatherings at that house. Drinking became the normal activity to do. Again, parents are fools to believe it is acceptable to have their teen partake in underage drinking just because it is under their own supervision. There are laws in place for a reason and parents should not break the laws. The laws are set up to protect teens from the harmful effects of underage drinking. Parents need to oblige and educate their teens rather than break the law that may result in hurting their teen or innocent bystanders. Another myth about alcohol is it is not a drug. Because alcohol is sold at many grocery stores and is available in many homes, teens believe alcohol is not a drug. For this reason, when I was a teen I thought I was a “good-girl” because the only illegal substance...

References: Kuntzman, G. (2005, Aug 09). Drinks on the house – Most teens get booze from their folks. New
York Post. Retrieved from: http://search.proquest.com/docview/334259947?accountid=458
Maffeo, R. (2002, 10). When the party 's over. Listen, 56, 12-14. Retrieved from:
http://search.proquest.com/docview/230520774?accountid=458
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. (2012, March).
Underage Drinking. Retrieved from http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/special
populations-cooccurring-disorders/underage-drinking
Temple, Jeff R, Shorey, Ryan C, Fite, Paula, Stuart, Gregory L, Le,Vi Donna. (2013). Substance use as a longitudinal predictor of the perpetration of teen dating violence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 42(4), 596-606
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