Opposing Perspectives and Solutions of Distracted Driving

Topics: Mobile phone, Technology, Personal digital assistant Pages: 3 (934 words) Published: November 3, 2013
For every year that passes, more than 5,000 Americans’ lives come to an abrupt end due to distracted driving. These numbers are almost identical to the number of road fatalities that are caused by intoxicated drivers, showing a correlation that someone who is on their cell phone while driving is just as likely to be in an accident as they would be if they decided to drive under the influence. With these numbers rapidly growing each year, more states are deciding to take legal action by banning the use of cell phones while driving. Simultaneously, the majority of automotive companies are including built-in technology such as Bluetooth and GPS systems to allow people to have access to technology while minimizing their risk of becoming distracted in the car. Two advocates for the removal of cell phones during driving are Mitch Bainwol, CEO at Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, and Rob Reynolds, executive director of FocusDriven. In a CQ Researcher article, they discuss their different opinions of the research that determines how frequent accidents occur with a hand-held device as natural or “rigged” and in response, offer different solutions to how these accidents will stop occurring.

Traffic safety administrators are constantly in the process of researching the effects of driving with a hand-held device. Both Bainwol and Renolds analyze the credibility of the research that safety administrations conduct and come to their own conclusions on how reliable these companies are. Based on the research results tested by Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, Bainwol states that “80 percent of crashes involve the driver looking away from the roadway just prior to the crash”. Bainwol forms his naturalistic argument by taking statistics found from researchers and trusts their results as facts. He is able to conclude that built-in technological devices allow drivers to keep their attention in front of them, similar to tuning a radio. An opposite viewpoint is...

Cited: Hosansky, David. "Distracted Driving." CQ Researcher. 4 May 2012: 401-24. Web. 27 Sept. 2013.
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