Critical Paper Art 1301

Topics: Garden of Eden, Adam and Eve, Visual arts Pages: 6 (1280 words) Published: September 16, 2014
 Like most people, when it comes to choosing something for me to work with I usually choose what calls

my attention most out of the many options, thinking that if I get something that I like it will be easier to

work and that is exactly how I chose “The Dissmision of Adam and Eve from Paradise”, an extraordinary

painting of Henry Fuseli. This painting pulled my sight towards it when I was walking in the MFAH

(Museum of Fine Arts, Houston). I like art and I think a painting is one of the most beautiful ways of self

expression, also I always considered myself a person who likes the romanticism, so The Dismission of

Adam and Eve from Paradise reflects that part romance and mystery that usually attracts my attention. A

work of art for me was an interesting task, is the first time in my life I appreciate something so amazing

that makes me want to contemplate the beauty of it. I will describe more in depth the chosen work stating

the principles and elements of design that I was able to appreciate. To conclude I will express in the best

way possible why I consider this work meaningful.

The Dismission of Adam and Eve from Paradise is a painting by Henry Fuseli, a Swiss who moved

to London in 1779 painted around 1796 to 1799, painter difficult to classify, has been described as

neoclassical, and preromantic-neo mannerist. His last Swiss painting showed soldiers swearing an

oath on their swords typical 18th-century art about revolution. It was workmanlike stuff, but

Fuseli's mind was elsewhere. He wanted his paintings to be revolution, not just to glorify it. His

images conclude that come from classical and mannerist traditions with others that are specific to

the Nordic and English painting, reflecting the sublime conception manifested in art and English

literature of the XVIII century. One of his most remarkable paintings The Dismission of Adam and

Eve from Paradise is in the collection of the MFAH (Museum of Fine Arts Houston), one of the

most prestigious places of our space city. The art work is oil canvas the dimensions of the painting

are about 150 x 73 cm. The Dismission of Adam and Eve from Paradise consist of four shapes. The setting

of the painting is set black, Fuseli makes the place seam bleakly and depressingly empty, we can get a

sense of loss and starkness. Adam and Eve are standing bare, were Adam is holding even as she faints.

Eve hides her face with her hands because she knows what she committed. God discovered them they have

eaten from the Tree of Knowledge. Within the Tree lived a giant serpent, which tempts Eve with a piece of

fruit. Once eating this piece of fruit, she knew what was right and wrong. She became a freethinking

woman, the veil of ignorance lifted from her eyes. She in turn went to Adam, and offered him the fruit,

which he ate, as well. Finding them hiding in the Garden, realizing that Adam and Eve knew of their nudity

and being ashamed of the passionate love they had made, God immediately knew what had happened. They

had in fact had eaten from the forbidden Tree of Knowledge. In his anger, he sends the Archangel Michael

to banish them into the arid, dry land surrounding the Paradise of Eden, never to return again . In the left

side, we can see the Archangel Michael that is looking down at Adam and Eve, the Archangel is sending

them away from the Garden of Eden. A faded image of face appears to the right side of the painting, the

face seems to be God, watching over them.

Continuing with the details about the principles and elements of design that I was able to

appreciate in this representational painting, the only light areas are the characters of the Angel,

Adam and Eve; with God just barely visible in the dark background, the angel seems to be just a

blur like a ghost in light white creamy color; around it has like a...

Cited: Henry Fuseli (1741-1825), The Dismission of Adam and Eve from Paradise, oil canvas, c. 1805, 150x73 cm, The Museum of Fine Arts Houston,
The artist was Henry Fuseli, a Swiss who moved to London in 1779. His last Swiss painting showed soldiers swearing an oath on their swords -- typical 18th-century art about revolution. It was workmanlike stuff, but Fuseli 's mind was elsewhere. He wanted his paintings to be revolution, not just to glorify it.
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